People

Tamar Pincus

Tamar is Professor of Health Psychology at Royal Holloway and is a registered practicing psychologist with the Health Professional Council. She has expertise in a variety of experimental, epidemiological and qualitative methodologies. Her research has included investigation of attention and recall in pain patients, psychological predictors for poor outcome in low back pain, and the study of clinicians’ beliefs and attitudes in low back pain. Tamar has collaborated in the UK and internationally with researchers from many disciplines, including doctors, physiotherapists, osteopaths, chiropractors and clinical psychologists. Most recently her research has focused on delivering effective reassurance to patients in primary care, and studying the use of technology to deliver rehabilitation. Read more here.

Danijela Serbic


Danijela is a Lecturer in psychology at Royal Holloway. Her past pr
ojects have focused on the role of pain-related guilt and diagnostic uncertainty in chronic low back pain (CLBP). The area of diagnosis in chronic disorders with high uncertainty has been neglected, and the impact of this uncertainty on patients is poorly understood. Danijela’s research in this area has specifically focused on the underlying cognitive process, such as memory biases, as well as the relationship between diagnostic uncertainty and depression, anxiety, guilt and disability in CLBP. Her current research projects focus on the role of guilt in chronic conditions and the impact of chronic pain on university students’ psychological, social and academic functioning.  Read more here.

Kathrin Braeuninger-Weimer


Kathrin is a PhD student broadly interested in the psychology of chronic pain, specifically focusing on consultation-based reassurance. Her PhD is based on a project funded by a grant from EuroSpine awarded to Professor Tamar Pincus and carried out within the NHS. In the first study for this project, qualitative research was used to inform the development of a consultation-based reassurance questionnaire. The research is based on interviews with patients who recently consulted about their low back pain and were recommended not to have surgery. Subsequently, the project will involve a prospective cohort study aiming to test the consultation-based reassurance measure against patient outcome within this specific group of low back pain patients.  Read more here.

Katrin Probyn

Katrin works on the RISE project led by Prof Tamar Pincus. She is carrying out a systematic review looking at individual placement and support (IPS) interventions in any population, which will inform the RISE intervention. Katrin is also working on the CHESS project, which aims to develop a self management intervention for people living with migraine and tension-type headache. To inform the CHESS intervention content, Katrin is carrying out a series of systematic reviews and meta analyses. Previously Katrin has worked on a Cochrane review looking at a rehabilitation following lumbar spinal stenosis. She is particularly interested in public health and rehabilitation medicine related research.

Khadija Naeem

Khadija is currently working on the RISE project in collaboration with the University of Warwick. The project aims to adapt, design and deliver an individual placement and support (IPS) intervention for people with chronic pain, to help them return to work. Khadija is working as a reviewer in this project, putting together a systematic review to inform how best to deliver and compile IPS interventions. She previously graduated with a Psychology degree from Royal Holloway, and is completing a Masters in Occupational Psychology. She is particularly interested in the area of occupational health psychology and health in the workplace.

Michael Evangeli


I am a Clinical Psychologist with many years of clinical experience in clinical health psychology, particularly working with people with HIV. One of my research interests relate to how pain in people with HIV is related to adjustment, wellbeing and quality of life. I am currently involved in collaborative research in South Africa on HIV pain.  Read more
here.

Jill Marshall

Professor Jill Marshall is a Professor of Law in the School of Law at RHUL and a qualified lawyer in England and Wales. She researches the legal regulation of who we are, our identity, and what it means to be human with a focus on women’s lives. This includes analysis of human rights and anti-discrimination law purporting to protect aspects of our identities in their complexities of real life situations with emphasis on care and belonging. Current projects include analysing secrecy and confidentiality in pregnancy and childbirth and how courts deal with these situations nationally and internationally. This includes investigating the use of, and human rights implications of, ‘deposit boxes’ usually in the side of hospitals where babies can be left safely but anonymously in many European, and other, countries, and examining rape and forced impregnation leading to ‘children born of conflicts’.  Read more here.

Joshua Balsters

Joshua joined Royal Holloway in 2017 as a lecturer in the psychology department. His wide array of research interests include: 1) neuroimaging methods (EEG, fMRI, simultaneous EEG/fMRI, pupillometry, and computational modelling of behaviour), 2) neuroanatomy (cortico-cerebellar information processing, the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system), and 3) translational neuroimaging (bridging animal and human brain imaging data, and understanding differences in brain activity/connectivity in autism and healthy ageing). His current research is largely focussed on the value-based decision making and the role of motivation in performance and therapy.  Read more here.

Manos Tsakiris

Manos Tsakiris studied psychology (BSc, Panteion University Athens, 1995-1999), philosophy (MSc in Philosophy of Mental Disorder, King’s College, London, 1999-2000), and cognitive neuropsychology (MSc, UCL, 2000-2001) before completing his PhD (2006) in psychology and cognitive neurosciences at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL. In 2007, he joined the Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, where he is currently Professor of Psychology. He is the recipient of the Young Mind and Brain Prize in 2014, of the 22nd Experimental Psychology Society Prize in 2015, and the NOMIS Foundation Distinguished Scientist Award in 2016. Since 2016, he is leading the interdisciplinary Body & Image in Arts & Science (BIAS) project at the Warburg Institute, and since 2017 the INtheSELF ERC Consolidator project at Royal Holloway.  Read more here.

Elisa Raffaella Ferre


Elisa is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway.  Her research investigates the interaction of signals from different sensory modalities, primarily between vestibular and somatosensory inputs.  Using a range of techniques from neuroscience, neurophysiology and experimental psychology, she has demonstrated that vestibular–multisensory interactions are crucial in several cognitive processes, including spatial representation, decision-making, bodily awareness, motor control, perspective taking, and gravity processing.  Her work includes the first investigation of vestibular-nociception interaction: she has recently demonstrated that vestibular signals reduce acute pain perception and modulate nociceptive cortical processing.Read more
here.

Jonathan Gabe


Jonathan Gabe is Professor of Sociology at Royal Holloway. He has published widely in the area of sociology of health and illness, including health care organisation, chronic illness, pharmaceuticals and sleep. Recent research has focused on sociological aspects of sleep and wakefulness promoting medications and innovative biomedical technologies (regenerative medical techniques) in elite sport. He is a past editor of the international journal Sociology of Health & Illness and is currently chair of the European Sociological Association Research Committee 16 Sociology of Health and Illness. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Science and of the Royal Society of Arts. Read more
here.